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SLICE

PROJECT 1
SIMON WHIBLEY ARCHITECTURE AND WORKSHOP ARCHITECTURE

A floating cloud-like object, a richly articulated field of spherical reflection, providing an ever-changing volume of shadow perforated by sunlight. Neither prototypical building nor self-contained expression, the architecture relies on its specificity to the NGVI, its garden site and its occupation. Rather than simply speak, it converses.

An elusive figure of the wedge-tailed eagle (referencing Bunjil, the divine creator within Bulin Nation mythology) converses with Balzac. A pliable structure reforms the space of the garden. Semi-transparent, reflective balloons recompose this scene. A helium-filled structure, lighter than the air it displaces, tethered with weighted tension cables, resting on the courtyard surface.

Render by_ Simon Whibley Architecture and Workshop Architecture

PROJECT 2
Jack May and James Fletcher
CONTENT SYSTEM

The ‘Content System’ reconceptualises the conventional stand-alone pavilion as a performative and interactive system that engages with Melbourne’s multidisciplinary design enterprise across multiple mediums at multiple scales. This scheme transcends the single discipline nature of architectural proposals. Multiple smaller interrelated elements create the new ‘Content System’ within the existing networks of the garden’s sculptures, NGV and Melbourne’s wider design enterprise. The ‘Content System’ consists of: three content displaying elements (red, blue & green), three corresponding audio channels (red, blue & green), three corresponding furniture types (red, blue & green), website and app, and seven content-input elements

Render by_ Jack May and James Fletcher

PROJECT 3
MARK RICHARDS ARCHITECTS

This pavilion is part of a history of architecturally designed pavilions “sitting in pretty gardens”. The structure is a timber engineered assembly combined with tensioned cables and bracing as required. The materials are sustainable timber components and recycled toilet fixtures. The toilet fixtures are assembled as screens and canopies to provide sun shading. The pavilion references the Australian outback by borrowing the iconography of the outback water tank, perched up on timber stilts. The gravity feed of the water tank is metaphorically “plumbed” to various bathroom fixtures within the structure. The pavilion questions our relationship with water and presents a model of household water use. The bathroom fixtures are arranged as a playful kit of parts. These templates include fixtures such as basins, pans, cisterns, baths and toilet seats.

Render by_ Kieran Roberts

Project 1

SIMON WHIBLEY ARCHITECTURE AND WORKSHOP ARCHITECTURE.

Project 2

Jack May and James Fletcher CONTENT SYSTEM.

Project 3

MARK RICHARDS ARCHITECTS.

Project 4

Fieldwork Architects THE NEW VERNACULAR.

Project 5

Architects Eat THIS IS NOT A FOLLY.

Project 6

Sibling CACHE CLOUD.

PROJECT 4
Fieldwork Architects
THE NEW VERNACULAR

This proposal celebrates the domestic and familiar, expanding on the 21st century vernacular of the Australian Dream – the humble-yet-grand suburban house.

We seek to subvert and honour our national typology through a playful yet evocative sculptural form that will activate the Grollo Equiset Gardens by day, and act as a beacon of culture and conviviality by night.

From recyclable materials to collaborative construction processes, our pavilion champions sustainability while prompting dialogue on housing affordability. Outer-suburban satellite pavilions will connect the NGV to peri-urban communities, enabling the digital decentralisation and sharing of culture between city and suburb.

Render by_ Fieldwork Architects

PROJECT 5
Architects Eat
THIS IS NOT A FOLLY

It is a representation of a folly, the idea that an image of a folly is not the same thing as the folly itself, once removed from its referent, the object to which it refers. It is an object of contemplation, one whose literal and insistent presence informs the process of beholding. It is an object that stands on its own, and that does not allude to anything beyond their own physical presence. It paradoxically disconnects and engages at the same time. Yet we call it folly, because it is supposed to be empty of meaning and content in order to interact with it a new kind of occupation; that like most art pieces, through engagement, it allows the user to create their own representation of the object.

Render by_ Architects EAT

PROJECT 6
Sibling
CACHE CLOUD

Several balls, or spheres, are positioned in the Grollo Equiset Garden, capturing information sources from the crowd via writing, recording, uploading, imaging, and feeding. These spheres expand and contract with the size and speed of the data, reshaping the pavilion’s waterproof canopy. A pinkish groundscape provides an undulating surface on which the gallery goers can move between the spheres. This surface creates different movements and events that disrupt ordinary time: sitting, walking, sliding, shifting, chatting, listening. In the undercroft of the groundscape and the data spheres lie several surfaces that feedback data – a kaleidoscope of selfies, sound bites, textual notes, glitches and responsive lighting – leaving memories of experience for the individual and for the city. After summer is over and the pavilion deconstructs, a single sphere containing the collected data is gifted to the gallery.

Render by_ Sibling